Except for my daughters, I have not grieved for any death as I have grieved for his. His was a great and beautiful spirit, he was a man – all man, from his crown to his footsoles. My reverence for him was deep and genuine.

It’s a commonly expressed and rather nice, romantic notion that we are all “sisters” and “brothers.”

Let’s be real. Fact is, we might be better served to accept that we are all siblings.

Siblings fight, pull each other’s hair, steal stuff, and accuse each other indiscriminately.

But siblings also know the undeniable fact that they are the same blood, share the same origins, and are family.

Even when they hate each other.

And that tends to put all things in perspective.

(Debbs’ letter to Robert Ingersoll’s granddaughter)

I was the friend of your immortal grandfather and I loved him truly… the name of Ingersoll is revered in our home, worshipped by us all, and the date of birth is holy in our calendar… I have never loved another mortal as I have loved Robert Green Ingersoll.

We preach and practice brotherhood – not only of man but of all living beings – not on Sundays only but on all the days of the week. We believe in the law of universal justice – that our present condition is the result of our past actions and that we are not subjected to the freaks of an irresponsible governor, who is prosecutor and judge at the same time; we depend for our salvation on our own acts and deeds and not on the sacrificial death of an attorney.

We have never preached violence, except the violence of love, which left Christ nailed to a cross, the violence that we must each do to ourselves to overcome our selfishness and such cruel inequalities among us. The violence we preach is not the violence of the sword, the violence of hatred. It is the violence of love, of brotherhood,the violence that wills to beat weapons into sickles for work.

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