She never knows when it might strike. The rage. And when it does, she loses her grip on herself-literally. At times, she could swear she sees another self-shiny black phantom, faceless, as though clad in a bodysuit-leaping out of her, pulling the rest of her in its wake. Over the edge.

So, if you’re a doctor, how can you recognize that you’re having a feeling? Some tips from Dr. Zinn:
Most emotions have physical counterparts. Anxiety may be associated with a tightness of the abdomen or excessive diaphoresis; anger may be manifested by a generalized muscle tightness or a clenching of the jaw; sexual arousal may be noted by a tingling of the loins or piloerection; and sadness may be felt by conjunctival injection or heaviness of the chest.

Love can crystallize things. When love is in the air, distressing rain can become a wonderful avalanche of shimmering diamonds. Raindrops are transformed into a flood of sparkling crystal pearls. The power of love can convert rain into a multitude of glittering prisms. The mental seduction of love and a boundless illusion, inflamed by a profound uprising emotion, can change any ordinary incident into a radiant, luminous voyage. ( “Crystallization under an umbrella” )

1 2 3 18