Moreover, in conversations with women, men do most of the talking (Haas,
1979), and despite hackneyed stereotypes about women being more talkative
than men, we’re apparently used to this pattern. When people listen to record-
ings of conversations, they think it’s more disrespectful and assertive for a
woman to interrupt a m~ than vice versa (Lafrance, 1992).

He handed the dust pan and brush over. I knew they wouldn’t be much use in cleaning the floor. I also knew the real reason he had given them to me: so he could look furtively at me, as I bent over.

That idea turned me on.

I welcomed it, and decided to give him a good look at what he wanted.

I rang the bell and she opened the door, dried her hands, and said heartily: ‘Hello, stranger. I was just saying to Cliff only tonight, it’s about time you showed up around here.’

I wanted to detach him from her, but first I had to sit through about ten minutes of her. She was my sister, but you don’t tell women things like I wanted to tell him. I don’t know why, but you don’t. You tell them the things you have under control; the things that you’re frightened of, you tell other men if you tell anyone. (“Nightmare”)

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