Power ceases in the instant of repose; it resides in the moment of transition from a past to a new state, in the shooting of the gulf, in the darting to an aim.

Power always and everywhere had had a pernicious, corrupting effect upon men. It “converts a good man in private life to a tyrant in office.” It acts upon men like drink: it “is known to be intoxicating in its nature”-“too intoxicating and liable to abuse.” And nothing within man is sufficiently strong to guard against these effects of power-certainly not “the united considerations of reason and religion,” for they have never “been sufficiently powerful to restrain these lusts of men.

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